Toward the end of every year, we get multiple groups and publications coming out with their predictions on what kind of weather we'll be experiencing over the next few months.

The Farmer's Almanac (not to be confused with the Old Farmer's Almanac) says that Northern Illinois and the Rockford area will be dealing with "icy and flaky" conditions, while the Old Farmer's Almanac (not to be confused with the Farmer's Almanac) says we'll be on the receiving end of "bone-chilling, below average temperatures."

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What Do Actual Scientists Say About Rockford's Approaching Winter?

Not to throw shade at the almanac folks, whether they're old, young, or middle-aged farmers, but it doesn't seem all that disrespectful to perhaps lean on the people with satellites and radar for weather information rather than some dudes counting the hairs on a caterpillar's butt, or whatever their methodology might be (just a joke, I'm sure there's more to it than that. Maybe.)

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The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Sees Things Differently

While the Farmers (both old and regular) are saying temperatures in Northern Illinois and the Rockford area will be well below average, NOAA's Climate Prediction Center says that Illinois, as well as other states in the Great Lakes region, could see wetter-than-average conditions (more snow), and an equal chance for below average, near average or above-average temperatures.

An "equal chance of below average, near average, or above average?" That's pretty much the scientific equivalent of saying "Uh...yeah...we're not really sure, but good luck to ya!"

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Looks like I owe a few farmers and their caterpillars an apology.

LOOK: The most expensive weather and climate disasters in recent decades

Stacker ranked the most expensive climate disasters by the billions since 1980 by the total cost of all damages, adjusted for inflation, based on 2021 data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The list starts with Hurricane Sally, which caused $7.3 billion in damages in 2020, and ends with a devastating 2005 hurricane that caused $170 billion in damage and killed at least 1,833 people. Keep reading to discover the 50 of the most expensive climate disasters in recent decades in the U.S.

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