There's two types of people in dangerous situations - the ones that run, and the ones that film it.

Personally, I'm that person who runs. I'm totally fine with seeing it on video later. When severe weather hits the Midwest, this scenario really comes into play. You have some people who hear a warning and grab their family and head to the basement. Then there's the other half of people who head to their porch to watch the show.

You can catch me in the basement. But apparently that's not the case for one couple in Central Illinois. Not only was this couple excited to see the storm, they actually took it upon themselves to chase the storm.

The footage is taken by Carrie Anderson and it shows the cloud hovering near the township of Covell, IL. Check out how crazy this video is.

Carrie says -

We watched the funnel come down from about seven miles away and decided to chase it to get a closer look, and we got about [a] half mile from the funnel. It gradually got bigger and longer but never touched the ground. It lasted about 10 minutes before it dissipated.

I'm more in agreement with this YouTube comment.

Yeah I wouldn't be mesmerized by a funnel cloud, I would be in complete terror that that damn thing was going to touch down and create a full tornado.

Get me OUT OF THERE! Listen, I get it, some people find weather really fascinating. I am just not one of those people.

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