It's not that there's anything wrong with the free COVID-19 tests being offered up by Uncle Sam for the low, low price of...well, free. The problem lies with how you order those tests.

So, if there's nothing wrong with the tests, why should you think twice about ordering them?

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A rapid antigen test or lateral flow home testing kit.
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Less Than 24 Hours After The Government Announced The Availability Of Free COVID-19 Test Kits, Suspicious Things Started To Happen

It probably took half a day, but right after the government launched an official website for Americans to request free rapid coronavirus tests, websites with suspiciously similar URLs (website addresses) are trying to lure people into purchasing pricey tests.

Just so you'll have it, here's the real, legitimate website to visit when and if you want up to four free COVID-19 testing kits:

https://www.covidtests.gov/

A link on that page takes visitors to https://special.usps.com/testkits

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Scammers Have Created A Slew Of Fake Websites, Hoping To Fool You Into Paying For Something That's Supposed To Be Free

The thing about the fake websites is that their URLs, or web addresses, have been set up to look a lot like the official government site.

Mashable.com says that these lookalike sites have already taken some unwary visitors:

Despite the similarity, sites like covidtestsgov.com are not official government sites — and in fact links out to expensive rapid tests for sale. And we do mean expensive. Clicking through covidtestsgov.com's "At Home COVID Test Kits" option will bring a would-be visitor to another site where rapid tests are listed for $39.97 per two pack.

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Answers to 25 common COVID-19 vaccine questions

Vaccinations for COVID-19 began being administered in the U.S. on Dec. 14, 2020. The quick rollout came a little more than a year after the virus was first identified in November 2019. The impressive speed with which vaccines were developed has also left a lot of people with a lot of questions. The questions range from the practical—how will I get vaccinated?—to the scientific—how do these vaccines even work?

Keep reading to discover answers to 25 common COVID-19 vaccine questions.