By now, you've seen umpteen reminders that this weekend is the weekend that we make that biannual clock change that everyone really hates but we don't do anything to change.

Oh yeah, I guess it's also called "Springing Forward."

Whatever. You say "po-tay-toe," I say changing the clocks is dumb and outdated.

Spring forward concept. Alarm clock, pen and notepad. Daylight saving time.
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Human hand adjusting the hour clock.
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No Matter How You Feel About It, We Still Have To Do It, But What Does Changing The Clock Do To Us?

Maybe you'll find yourself to be a bit groggy on Monday morning. If that's all that's happening to you, consider yourself lucky.

A 2014 study published in Open Heart found a 25% jump in the number of heart attacks occurring the Monday after the Spring clock change, compared to other Mondays during the year. The total number of heart attacks didn’t change for the whole week, the burden just shifted to earlier in the week.

Heart.org reports that in Sweden, researchers found an average 6.7 percent greater risk of heart attack in the three days after the spring change. Inspired by that finding, a group of U.S. researchers conducted their own study and determined that heart attack risk jumped 24 percent the Monday after switching over to daylight saving time.

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Then Comes The Fatigue And Loss Of Productivity At Work

Which, when you think about it, is going to happen anyway. Aren't we told every year that the March Madness college basketball tournament causes the United States to lose something like a billion-zillion hours of office productivity?

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Actually, Google searches for entertainment content (things like “YouTube,” “videos,” “music,” and “ESPN”) rise sharply on the Monday after the spring time change, according to a 2012 study in the Journal of Applied Psychology, suggesting that sleep deprived employees are spending more time “cyberloafing,” or using the Internet for personal use while pretending to do work.

Maybe it's not the clock-changing that's causing us problems, it's college basketball. I'll bet this smart-sounding British guy has other ideas:

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30 famous people you might not know were college athletes

Stacker dug deep to find 30 celebrities who were previously college athletes. There are musicians, politicians, actors, writers, and reality TV stars. For some, an athletic career was a real, promising possibility that ultimately faded away due to injury or an alternate calling. Others scrapped their way onto a team and simply played for fun and the love of the sport. Read on to find out if your favorite actor, singer, or politician once sported a university jersey.